Emanuele Aldrovandi at Mousson d’ètè

On the 26th August, in the frame of Mousson d’ètè Festival, will be presented the stage presentation of the text “Sorry we didn’t die at the sea” by the Italian author Emanuele Aldrovandi.

Excusez-nous si nous ne sommes pas morts en mer
Text by Emanuele Aldrovandi
Translated by Federica Martucci and Olivier Favier
Directed by Ivica Buljan
With Alain Fromager, Charlie Nelson, Didier Manuel and Johanna Nizard

In a not-too-distant future, Europe has become a continent of emigrants. European citizens, in a quest to find better jobs and a better future, try to reach the “richer” countries, but they have to do so illegally because those countries have since closed their borders. Among many ways of migrating illegally, one of the most widely used is the shipping container: the illegal immigrants come on board and pay a thousand dollars on departure and a thousand dollars on arrival, without knowing where they’ll be offloaded. The characters in this dystopian story are four, and they have no names. They’re identified solely by their physical traits: Robust, Beauty, Tall are the three migrants and Soft is the owner of the container. The play is divided in four parts. The first one takes place at the harbour, before the journey, the second one inside the container, the third one in the middle of the sea after the shipwreck of the boat they were traveling on and the fourth is a dreamlike epilogue – or perhaps a hallucination: the arrival of whales. As Davide Carnevali writes in the preface to the Italian version published by CUE press, the play’s strength is that it doesn’t act as “a parasite to reality, exploiting the problem of immigration and its media coverage. On the contrary, it’s a play that wants to say something that the media doesn’t regarding this problem; to show an image of this reality that isn’t generally shown; to clearly illustrate its dynamics and its motives. This is how theater reaffirms its meaning, a profound one: that of reopening the dialogue with society, where the media often close it.”